Friday, October 31, 2014

Forbidden Views: The Jablanica Power Plant

The Hydro Power Plant “Jablanica”, located in the same named town, is the first and largest power plant on the river Neretva. It was built in two phases from 1947 to 1955 and from 1955 to 1958. Electricity production in the power plant began in February 1955.

After the construction it was the largest hydropower facility in the former Yugoslavia. Taking photos of it is forbidden, which is indicated by many traffic signs along the way. I'm not really sure why that's the case. But I managed to get some sneak peeks anyway. :)

click on the images for a bigger view



The autumn colors shielded the forbidden views, but gave enough away, to make the scene intriguing.



Further up stream, you will find the magnificent Jablanica Dam, which I didn't get to visit that day, but I found an image online, to show it's grandness.


Are there any hydro power plants nearby in your corners of the world?
I think they are much prettier and organic sights then nuclear power plants.


44 comments:

  1. Great shots Mersad.
    We do have hydro- electricity plants but they are mostly storage plants. they pump water up hill when there is low demand and generate from the pumped water at peak times. They are better than wind turbines. Horrible things they are, they ruin the landscape, cost a fortune and are only about 20% efficient. The only people to gain are the big landowners. They are for the most part absentee landlords and can earn millions from the bloody things.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. At least it's a clean energy source, but yeah, they are a bit odd when dispersed all over a beautiful field.

      Delete
    2. The province of Burgendland, south of Vienna, generates as much electricity from renewable energy, mostly wind-turbines, as is consumed there. Where there's a will, there's a way, I'd say. Austria held a referendum in 1978, rejecting the production of nuclear energy.

      Delete
  2. we have nuclear power plant here about 30 minutes drive, i had to look up if we have any hydropower and there is only one in Florida. i found this cool list of the whole world and where they are.
    http://globalenergyobservatory.org/list.php?db=PowerPlants&type=Hydro

    i like the river down in the trees...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That list is really cool. Found the Jablanica Hydro plant there as well! :D

      Delete
  3. Beautiful views, Mersad! We do have one - over at Fort Peck Dam on the Missouri River About 50 miles away. There are several more on the Missouri River near Great Falls about 250 miles away.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I goggled it, and it's really grand!

      Delete
  4. Love your vantage point. The composition is nice and yes, much more organic than the nuclear plants!

    ReplyDelete
  5. How very interesting to see a forbidden view. The dam looks like something I've seen in a James Bond movie. All the best, Bonny

    ReplyDelete
  6. The security for forbidden photography is often a mystery so I LOVE your stealth photos. The vantage point of the last photo is wonderful and it is a great shot!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I love dams. This would be a great one to visit.

    ReplyDelete
  8. afraid of terrorists and militants scoping out the place. love the water dam!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Such a beautiful, incredible view and an awesome dam!! Wonderful captures as always, Mersad! Hope you and your family have a wonderful weekend! Enjoy!!

    ReplyDelete
  10. I especially like the final shot of the power plant---with the dark cloud!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Wonderful views of this "forbidden" place. We have a couple hydro dams in Arizona and you are so right, they are much prettier than nuclear plants.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Das Bild von oben ist genial. Wow, wohin musstest du dafür raufklettern? :-)

    ReplyDelete
  13. I love the last shot especially!

    ReplyDelete
  14. 'No photos' signs are probably from era of former Yugoslavia. During socialism it was thought that photos and locations can be used by enemy. Today, anything can be seen by satellite, so those signs have no points anymore.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Beautiful, and Yes is better then nuclear
    Not so far from my home there is an hydroelectric power plant and is so a beautiful place to river walk
    you will take a look -->> http://stefanodav.blogspot.it/2013/12/hydroelectric-power-plant.html
    have a great week end
    Stefano

    ReplyDelete
  16. very beautiful and rugged scenery around the power plant.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Gorgeous photos! The third and fourth are fantastic! Beautiful country.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I'm sure the no photograph policy followed September 11. That event caused governments all over the world to realize that critical infrastructure is quite vulnerable to people with bad intentions. That kind of policy has been followed in the USA, too, post-September 11.

    Adrian is only partially right about pumped storage plants. Yes, they have lower efficiency than traditional plants, but they are peak plants, meaning that they will only be used at times when the electric is running out of its traditional sources. Peak plants always cost more than base load and intermediate plants because they are only expected to operate for relatively short periods, such as during heat waves or cold spells, or during the busiest parts of the business day.

    No hydro of importance in Florida. It is too flat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The "no photos" signs were definitely there before 9/11. As Jasna pointed out they are probably from the era of former Yugoslavia. I definitely remember the signs back in 1998 when I lived in Jablanica for a short time.

      Delete
  19. what wonderful scenery and colours in these shot but last last photograph is breathtakingly beautiful

    ReplyDelete
  20. Nice photos. I know there are places in Washington DC where you can't use a tripod because they are afraid it might conceal a weapon. Also some places have concerns about competitors imitating them, stealing secrets. But forbidding photographs is pretty much impossible with so many cell phones around.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think that even in this case that rule is outdated, since you can find images from the place on their official website, then you have google maps, etc. Thanks for visiting Linda.

      Delete
  21. I like this kind of power plant : it is not too ugly in the landscape, and it produce a lot of the energy we need for blogging... ^^

    ReplyDelete
  22. Looking at a power plant it is quite rare to say that it is beautiful, but this one you are showing us really is! The pictures are great and you just reminded me of a ship that often called in our port, the Jablanica, she was probably named after the place... I think she is still around, but with another name.

    ReplyDelete
  23. great shots of the almost hidden dam and good to see the last shot and to see you quoting its source properly.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Yes, we have several hydro plants in my area. Love your shots! Especially the wide angle of the dam and lake.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I love the scenery and forest around the hydro plant. The dam and lake are beautiful. We do have some similar scenes around my state..have a happy weekend!

    ReplyDelete
  26. Before moving to Berlin, I was in Toronto Canada. As you can imagine there was power from Niagara Falls, but it wasn't dammed like this. You really got some beautiful landscapes!

    ReplyDelete
  27. Lovely views!
    We had two dams on a local river here. Both were constructed in the early 1900s and have recently been removed to restore a fishery. It was one of the largest such restoration projects in U.S. history. The power they proved was replaced from larger sources.

    ReplyDelete
  28. strange how you arent really allowed to take photos of it
    love the landscapes all around it - the forest and the mountains
    interesting to me too as my father use to be an electrician all his working life

    ReplyDelete
  29. Fantastic scenes...but I'm wondering just why photos are forbidden. All in all, the work done was a colossal undertaking in that day and age. Wow.

    ReplyDelete
  30. You got great shots of this plant. The fall colors are gorgeous. We have many Dams in our area and also an old Nuclear Facility as well.

    ReplyDelete
  31. I just love the colour palette of the forest ending next to the water. Awesome!

    ReplyDelete
  32. Beautiful photos. Unfortunately I don't live in an area where hydro, wind or solar are feasible alternatives to fossil fuels and nuclear.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Yes we have hydroelectric dams along the Missouri River. The largest is the Oahe Dam in Pierre, SD. It creates Lake Oahe, the fourth largest man made lake in the U.S. It is 231 miles long and has a shore line of over 2,200 miles. There are two other hydroelectric dams in our state all on the Missouri River. Our latest electrical power comes from a large wind generating area only about twenty miles from us, and it is still rapidly growing.
    Suspect the ban on photography is a hold over from a past era of secrecy.

    ReplyDelete
  34. I love a good mystery! :-) Beautiful mountain views and oh the lake at the dam! Gorgeous! We have a dam at Roosevelt Lake in N. Arizona that is very lovely. I shared photos of it a couple of years ago when we were up that way. The dam was named after President Theodore Roosevelt (our Rough Rider President 1901-1909)

    ReplyDelete
  35. Great views, and good to see nature's power harnessed to create clean energy!

    ReplyDelete

Subscribe by E-Mail for blog posts in your inbox:

Subscribe

Image Credits

All Rights are Reserved. The images may not be reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without the written permission of the author.

Follow this blog on Blogger